Generation Rx – September Edition; Molly

MDMA, popularly known as ecstasy or molly is a synthetic drug similar to amphetamine and mescaline. Use of this drug produces increased energy, euphoria (feeling happy), changes in emotional feelings and mood.  Currently, this drug has no accepted medical use in USA, it is considered Schedule I substance. There are varying reports on the results of addictive properties of MDMA.  However, this drug is in clinical trial for a possible aid to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety in terminal cancer patients.

MDMA, popularly known as ecstasy or molly is a synthetic drug similar to amphetamine and mescaline. Use of this drug produces increased energy, euphoria (feeling happy), changes in emotional feelings and mood.  Currently, this drug has no accepted medical use in USA, it is considered Schedule I substance. There are varying reports on the results of addictive properties of MDMA.  However, this drug is in clinical trial for a possible aid to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety in terminal cancer patients.

MDMA, directly or indirectly, increases the release of serotonin, substance responsible for mood changes, which influences the mood, appetite, and sleep. Serotonin than triggers release of other substances (oxytocin and vasopressin) which play important roles in love, trust, sexual arousal, and other social experiences.  The after effects of this drug may occur during the days or weeks after.  Heavy users may experience problems with attention and memory if MDMA is combined with other drugs (e.g. marijuana).

After effects of MDMA: confusion, depression, sleep problems, drug craving, and anxiety.

MDMA acts as other stimulants, cocaine and amphetamines, leading to increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Users may experience muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating. MDMA interferes with body’s ability to regulate temperature which in rare cases can lead to liver, kidney, or cardiovascular system failure or even death.

Pill form of “molly” may contain other drugs instead or in addition, ephedrine (stimulant), dextromethorphan (cough suppressant), ketamine, caffeine, cocaine, methamphetamine, or even cathinones (active ingredient of “bath salts”). These substances when mixed with other substances such as marijuana and alcohol may put an individual at even higher risk for adverse health effects.

 

References:

1.    National Institute of Drug Abuse [Internet]. Bethesda, MA: USA.gov. [Cited 2013 Sep 9]. Available from: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/mdma-ecstasy-or-molly